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Year Name of Publication Summary Image
2015 Malta Skills Forecast 2025
The economic crisis which struck Europe in 2008 had only very limited impact on the economic and labour market trends in Malta. In 2013, Malta’s unemployment rate was 6.5%, well below the EU average of 11%. The European Commission forecasts GDP growth for Malta of around 3% in 2015 and 2016.

2015 Skills, Qualifications and Jobs in the EU: The Making of a Perfect Match?
What has been the impact of the economic crisis on skill mismatch? Is there a cost in getting the unemployed quickly into any job? Why is skill mismatch prevalent among the EU workforce? To answer these and other timely questions on skill mismatch, Cedefop carried out the European skills and jobs (ESJ) survey.

2015 Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2015  Success in raising employment levels and living standards in Europe depends on effective support policies as well as positive macro-economic strategies. In this respect, this year’s Employment and Social Developments review addresses a range of issues.
It starts by looking at the contribution of entrepreneurship and self-employment to job creation and growth and the need to tackle the difficulties faced by the self-employed and notably micro and small companies. It then looks at the role of labour legislation in supporting more and better jobs and the need to strike the right balance between flexibility and protection. It then moves on to look at the best actions to avoid unemployment turning into long-term unemployment and inactivity. More broadly, given technology change, globalisation and population ageing, which translates into a reduction in the working-age population, the EU needs to increase employment and increase productivity. Mobility and migration can play an important role here. In relation to this, Europe needs to improve skills and better match skills with evolving demands. It also needs to promote labour market participation of older workers and women. Social policies, including pension policies and family policies (for example, child care and long-term care), can support longer working lives and increase employment of women. Promoting social dialogue and the involvement of social partners in the development of employment and social policies may help the implementation and effectiveness of such policies.
2015 Labour Market and Wage Developments in Europe 2015  Labour market outcomes have been improving against the background of a modest recovery. The unemployment rate in the EU appears unusually reactive to the weak recovery. Yet, it stood above pre-crisis levels, at around 9.5% in the EU and 11% in the euro area in May 2015. Labour market disparities have started to fall across the EU and the euro area.
2014 Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2014  The 2014 Employment and Social Development Review provides a broad overview of the challenges facing the European Union over the coming years as it slowly emerges from the worst recession in its history. It highlights the scale of the challenges, but also the benefits of continuing to invest in education, training and wider labour market and social policies alongside the actions being taken to restore economic growth in the light of the Union’s 2020 employment and social goals.
2013 Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2013  The 2013 ESDE report offers an in-depth and wide-ranging review of key labour market and social challenges facing the EU as it slowly emerges from recession. Where will Europe’s new jobs come from in an increasingly competitive global economy? Will active inclusion policies support help address rising levels of poverty among those of working age? Will the improvement in the position of women on the labour market during the crisis be sustained or slip away with the recovery? Is the divisive issue of undeclared work being effectively addressed? Will all Member States progress equally, or do the weakest risk falling further behind? Have national social security systems been effective and efficient in maintaining incomes during the recession and in addressing their longer-term goals? Do we need to adapt the ways we measure economic and social progress in order to take proper account of inequalities? The report will be available in printed and electronic format in English. All the graphs and tables can be downloaded both in gif and excel format by accessing the individual chapters.
2012 Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2012  DG Employment builds on the first Employment and Social Developments in Europe (ESDE) Review in this second edition, by conducting an analysis of the economic and social situation in the EU. Following a year which has seen several Member States witnessing escalating debt crises, public spending is decreasing. With different parts of the EU seeing different social and employment trends, finding the right policy responses in certain key areas is crucial. Long-term employment exclusion, its impact on the labour market and the broader social dimension, is considered in this context. The functioning and efficiency of various social protection systems is also examined, with a particular focus on the effect of distributional and design aspects. Finally, the Review looks at the impact of wage developments and the problem of skill mismatches as well, concluding a fair and equitable structural adjustment agenda is needed. This publication will be available in printed format in English
2011 Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2011 The economic, financial and sovereign debt crises and subsequent austerity measures underline the need for a more integrated approach to employment and social policy. This review merges two previous European Commission reports on these areas. It begins with an overview of the current European employment and social situation before looking at recent shifts in Europe's job structure and in income inequality. The review then examines patterns of poverty and social exclusion in Europe and the phenomenon of in-work poverty. Issues of active ageing, intra-EU labour mobility and the impact of enlargement are also covered. The review is available in English only.
2010 Skills supply and demand in Europe: medium-term forecast up to 2020  Cedefop’s new skill demand and supply forecast up to 2020 sets the scene for anticipating future trends. The aim of this report is to provide policy-makers, employers, skills providers, employment services and individual learners with better information to make more informed decisions.

2010 Employment in Europe 2010 Produced annually by the Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities, the Employment in Europe report is now in its 22nd year. It has become one of the main tools of the European Commission for supporting Member States in analysis, formulation and implementation of their employment policies. Employment in Europe 2010 begins by assessing EU labour market adjustment since the onset of the economic crisis, taking account of the crisis’ impact and future prospects. It also analyses EU and Member State policies aimed at mitigating the effects of the crisis and supporting recovery, and looks ahead to their gradual phasing out. The Report then examines the need to reduce segmentation in labour markets and improve the job situation of young people before drawing conclusions on the way forward.
2010 Europe 2020 initiatives Europe 2020 is the EU's growth strategy with five ambitious objectives - on employment, innovation, education, social inclusion and climate/energy - to be reached by 2020. The three flagship initiatives of the Europe 2020 strategy that fall under the areas of employment, social affairs and inclusion are:
  • Youth on the move:  aims to improve young people's chances of finding a job by helping students and trainees gain experience in other countries, and improving the quality and attractiveness of education and training in Europe;
  • An agenda for new skills and jobs: aims to give fresh momentum to labour market reforms to help people gain the right skills for future jobs, to create new jobs and overhaul EU employment legislation; 
  • European platform against poverty and social exclusion: aims to bolster work at all levels to reach the agreed EU headline target of lifting at least 20 million people out of poverty and exclusion by 2020.